How Long Does Miso Soup Last? Tips For Storing Miso Soup

Have you ever wanted to know how long miso soup lasts and remains delicious? Discover the answer and enjoy flavorful soups for days!

a bowl of tofu miso soup and in a saucepan.

Do you have leftover miso soup from the previous day and wonder how long it will stay fresh? Here’s all you need to know about delicious and flavorful miso soup!

You will learn its expiration date, how to store it, reheat it, and get some quick and easy recipes. Let’s get started!

How long does miso soup last at room temperature?

Tofu miso soup in a sauce pan.

Up to 2 hours.

To ensure your miso soup tastes its best, don’t leave it at room temperature for longer than two hours – otherwise, the bacteria may grow and spoil the taste.

So, room temperature is not the best place to keep it. It’s best to store it safely in your refrigerator, especially in the heat of summer or when living in a hot climate.

How long does miso soup last in the fridge?

Tofu miso soup in a jar.

Up to 3 days.

Miso soup is best fresh but will last up to three days in the fridge. The actual shelf life, however, depends on what ingredients are included. For example, eggs, moyashi (soybean sprout), and clams don’t last longer than other ingredients.

  • How to store – Let it cool, transfer the soup to a glass jar or airtight container, and store it in the fridge.
  • How to reheat – Refrigerated miso soup should always be heated before serving. Transfer to a saucepan and heat it on the stove, or transfer to a microwave-safe bowl and heat it in a microwave – just don’t let it boil and lose any of that excellent miso flavor and aroma.

How long does miso soup last in the freezer?

Wakame miso soup in a saucepan.

Up to 2 weeks.

It’ll last up to 2 weeks in the freezer, although that time can vary depending on its ingredients.

Not all ingredients are suitable for freezing. When frozen, tofu and potatoes turn dry and unappetizing, so take them out before freezing.

  • How to store – Let it cool, transfer the one serving to a freezer-safe bag, and store it in the freezer. Or you can use ice cube trays as well.
  • How to thaw and reheat – Transfer frozen miso soup to the fridge a half day before eating, transfer it to a saucepan, and heat it just before boiling.

How do you know if miso soup has gone bad?

When your miso soup in the fridge has been sitting for days, you may wonder if it’s safe to eat.

Appearances and aromas are key indicators that it is spoiled – watch out for slimy layers or strange smells. If you find any signs of spoilage below, it’s best to throw it away.

Sign of Spoilage

  • Appearance – Slimy, stringy, white mold
  • Aroma – Sour smell, old smell, musty smell

How to Extend the Shelf Life of Miso Soup

miso paste.

These simple tips keep your miso soup flavorful and fresh for as long as possible.

  • Add more miso paste – The higher salt content has a longer shelf life, so boost its saltiness by adding more miso or reducing the amount of water. The miso soup becomes saltier, but if you dilute the soup before reheating it, then it should be no problem.
  • Store without miso paste – Store your soup without adding miso paste, extending its shelf life. Add miso paste when you eat it.

What’s in Miso Soup?

miso soup ingredients illustration.

What’s in miso soup? Here are the key ingredients:

  • Miso paste
  • Dashi (soup stock)
  • Ingredients of your choice (such as tofu and seaweed)

Each ingredient adds its unique contribution to the flavor. Its complexity comes from the balance of umami, saltiness, and sweetness.

To learn more about miso soup, you can explore these articles:

Japanese Miso Soup Recipes

6 miso soup images.

Looking for a delicious way to use up your miso paste? Check out these Miso Soup Recipes. I share 8 easy-to-follow miso soup recipes that you can make at home.

Miso soup is the most simple and easy dish in Japanese cooking. I hope you will enjoy the authentic flavor!

FAQ

How long can I keep miso soup in the fridge?

It will last up to 3 days in the fridge. However, it depends on what ingredients are included. For example, eggs, moyashi (soybean sprout), and clams don’t last longer than that.

Can I keep miso soup in the fridge?

Yes, you can. You should keep it in either the fridge or freezer.

How do you know if miso has gone bad?

Appearances and aromas are key indicators that it is spoiled – watch out for slimy layers or strange smells. If you find any signs of spoilage (Appearance – Slimy, stringy, white mold; Aroma – Sour smell, old smell, musty smell), it’s best to get rid of it altogether.

Is it OK to reheat miso soup?

Always warm your miso soup before serving. Transfer to a saucepan and heat it on the stove, or transfer to a microwave-safe bowl and heat it in a microwave.

Why you should not boil miso?

Because boiling will lose excellent miso flavor and aroma. When heating, stop right before boiling.

Is it OK to drink miso soup every day?

Yes, it’s ok. Japanese people eat it every day. Miso soup is nutritious and great for gut health.

Thanks For Stopping By!

tofu miso soup in a saucepan.

Thank you for taking the time to read my blog♡. If you’ve tried this recipe (or any other recipe on the blog), please give it a star rating below!

Also, feel free to leave comments if you have any questions. I love hearing from you!

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2 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I haven’t made this recipe, but I’ve made miso soup a couple of times now and I just needed to know how long it lasts in the fridge. However this is one of those excellent guides that doesn’t tell you how to make one type of miso soup, but how to make miso soup in general.

    In the UK it’s hard to source some of the ingredients, so I’ve been substituting the seaweed with spinach, and it’s nice to know what’s core (the dashi and miso paste) and what’s nice to have to your taste (everything else). Other recipes don’t do this and you have to work it out by reading a few and figuring it out yourself. It reminds me very much of the “Aha!” moment I had when Carluccio’s book taught me how to make risottos in the same way with whatever I had lying around the house rather than making a specific risotto and my life has been better for it since.

    I have also been totally flummoxed by the different miso paste colours and now, I no longer am!

    1. Hi Elizabeth, thank you for sharing your experience with miso soup! I’m glad to hear that the recipe guide has been helpful to you. I understand that sourcing Japanese ingredients outside of Japan can be challenging, but feel free to substitute with your favorite vegetables and ingredients to make it your own!